16 Days of Activism Social Media Toolkit

The 16 Days of Activism is a world-wide campaign that connects two important UN observational Days: 25 November (the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women) and 10 December (International Human Rights Day), thus cementing the ideology that women’s rights are human rights and that violence against women is therefore a human rights issue. You can read more about it here. This year’s theme is Leave no one behind: End violence against women. This resonates with us because it emphasises the importance of intersectionaility and how all oppressions are linked. If we are to advocate for the equality of all women, that we must not only advocate for gender equality, but also for racial justice, and for the rights of people with disability, and so on.

Following are 16 social media images and suggested text (that you can use as is or adapt to suit), that you can use for your 16 Days of Activism social media campaigning.

You can either preload the entire batch to your social media scheduler, manually post them each day, or natively schedule them in Facebook by drafting each post and then clicking the drop-down arrow (next to the publish button, on your Page) and selecting “Schedule”. You will then be able to select your preferred date and time for the post.

Day 1 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

If people don’t feel safe at home, they should at least feel safe at work. An FDV policy for your workplace will ensure there are some minimum protocols in place to ensure victims are supported to be safe at work. Domestic violence leave will help give victims the time and space to navigate all the practical considerations for leaving the relationship. #16days16ways(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 2 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

Violence against women is caused by systemic oppression. Gender inequality is one structure that drives violence against women, but so is colonialism and so is racism (and others). This means we cannot adequately address violence against women, without acknowledging and addressing the intersecting oppressions that drive this social epidemic- including colonialism. We have a long way to go on our reconciliation and healing journey as a nation, but one small thing we can do to work towards that is to acknowledge whose land it is that we work live and play on #16days16ways
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Day 3 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

In an effort to be inclusive, we often request people attending our events or venues to let us know if they have any “accessibility needs” so that we can try and meet them. However in our efforts to be helpful, our ablist privilege can prevent us from seeing that this is actually not fair and creating more work for people with disability. If we don’t provide info upfront about the accessibility/inclusivity of the event/venue, than a person with disability cannot assess what their accessibility needs are. This can be off-putting if the person wishing to attend the event does not wish to have to provide you with a list of every possible accessibility need they could have. So in our efforts to be inclusive, we can be subtly promoting exclusion. #letsdobetter #16days16ways (Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 4 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

A movie passes the Bechdel Test if it meets all 3 of the following criteria:

1) There are at least two women in the film;

2) They have a conversation with each other;

3) About something other than a man.

Surprisingly, not a lot of movies actually meet this criteria. The way women and diverse groups are represented (or not) in the media has an incredible impact on reinforcing social power (or lack of) within our society. Being cognisant of the way media representation perpetuates social inequality is an important first step towards achieving social justice. #16days16ways(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 5 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

What are some heteronormative assumptions you might be making on the daily? Come up with a list and think about actions you could take to be more inclusive to people who may be from LGBITQ communities.

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Day 6 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

If you notice that women are consistently being interrupted by men, or that men seem to be condescendingly over-explaining things to women in your social settings (and you feel comfortable to do so), call it out. #16days16ways(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 7 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

Hint: It’s an extension of the patriarchy. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. #wereallinthistogether #16days16ways(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 8 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

Consumerism (how you spend your $) can be a powerful form of protest (particularly when it’s coordinated). Whether you boycott particular brands/companies/artists that you know are perpetuating misogyny or reinforcing the patriarchy in some way, or you’re putting your dollar behind brands that you know contribute to social change. Your $ makes a difference! #16days16ways(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 9 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

Media literacy provides opportunity to question the dominant narrative being fed to us by mainstream media. What groups are in charge of mainstream media and what narratives are they trying to convince us of? Representation (or lack of) women and diverse groups in the media reinforces social power. Alternative media is important for building dialogue and showing other perspectives (disrupting the dominant narrative). Here are a few suggestions to get you started:

1. Muslim Girl- the online magazine for young, modern women- creating an open and honest dialogue about all things Islam http://muslimgirl.com/

2. This blog by the Victorian Women’s Trust: https://www.vwt.org.au/blog/

3. Womankind Magazine- an advert-free magazine about self, identity and meaning in today’s society http://www.womankindmag.com/

4. Everyday Feminism- an online magazine about applied feminism https://everydayfeminism.com/(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 10 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

Start your own hashtag to start dialogue building about whatever social justice issue you think requires a conversation. Hot tip: Not feeling creative? Do a Twitter or Facebook search for existing topics and just add your two-cents into that conversation! #16days16ways(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 11 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

Adding your physical energy to a cause by attending a protest or a march can be a great way to make an impact. But remember- it’s not the only way! #16days16ways(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 12 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

Searching this hashtag on Twitter will provide you with a multitude of opportunities to join in on Twitter chats aimed at disrupting violence against women.(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 13 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

Women with disability are particularly vulnerable to FDV and sexual assault, but they also experience forms of violence that are specifically targeted to them, such as carer abuse, forced sterilisation and growth attenuation (when parent’s of  children with disability choose to give them hormones to stunt their growth, so that they will be more “manageable”.(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 14 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

Words have power. Saying “domestic violence situation” instead of “abuser” or “perpetrator” actually is a type of victim blaming. This is because if we name the “situation” as the source of abuse (rather than the abuser), than the abuser is not fully responsible, and a victim cannot exist (since there isn’t a clear perpetrator. This means abusers get (somewhat) off the hook, while victims are now mutually responsible for the violence by virtue of being a party to the “situation”. #usetherightwords #16days16ways(Copy/paste the text + right click the image to download or save.)

Day 15 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

Donating $ (if you can spare a few dollars) is an easy way to make a contribution to a cause. Remember: if you are low on cash you can donate in the form of goods (such as clothes that you no longer need) or time (volunteer!). #16days16ways

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Day 16 (or whatever day you’d like to make this post)

Volunteering can make a meaningful difference and is a great choice if you have more time than money, or you are a skilled volunteer. #16days16ways

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Thank you for helping us to spread the word! #activismisforeveryone